Perspectives on Racial Justice | Backwards to the Future: Pitfalls and Promises of Public Education

How is it possible that public schools in American society have remained virtually unchanged over the past 150 years? Youth, to this day, still experience separate and unequal education. Why is that? This interactive session, facilitated by Horace R. Hall, PhD, associate professor in the College of Education, unpacks this query through a critical examination of educational inequalities and the power struggles they have represented across time. This session invites attendees to personally reflect on their assumptions, beliefs and values about public schools, as well as to question the purposes and meanings of these institutions past and present.

Perspectives on Racial Justice is a series that seeks to further DePaul University’s commitment to ending racial injustice on campus and in our community. Presented by the Office of Alumni Relations in partnership with faculty and alumni experts, the series strives to bring awareness to racial inequalities, continue the dialogue on issues of race and ethnicity and support our communities of color.

Horace R. Hall, PhD, is associate professor in DePaul’s College of Education. He mostly teaches courses related to the historical and social dimensions of American schooling. In addition to his teaching, Dr. Hall is the founder and co-director of a Chicago-based youth activist program titled, R.E.A.L. (Respect, Excellence, Attitude, and Leadership). Launched in 2000, R.E.A.L.’s broad mission is to provide children and adolescents with a genuine sense of empowerment and agency through community voice and action.

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